March 23, 2014

This is the perfect song.

(Source: Spotify)

7:15pm
  
Filed under: music spotify 
November 13, 2013

This song is perfect.

I can just imagine a girl falling in love with me. She hangs on my every word, her eyes dazzle with the adventures I lead. There’s summer sand in every crook, and it burrows and starts to irritate. Slowly my ego begins to grate, my overambition and lack of triumph—but high, lordy talk—dig. In the final act, the love falls. She sends this song to me sarcastically, and the song singes with personified crumpled eyes, extended lips, overexpressed sarcastic tone. Wonderful.

(Source: Spotify)

July 29, 2013

(Source: Spotify)

12:47am
Filed under: music spotify 
June 2, 2013

For the stalker.

(Source: Spotify)

11:50pm
Filed under: music spotify 
April 4, 2013

The guitar in this song, and the vocals, and everything. Good springtime song, I think.

(Source: Spotify)

2:12pm
Filed under: music spotify 
March 23, 2013

(Source: Spotify)

12:54am
Filed under: music spotify 
March 22, 2013

(Source: Spotify)

7:42pm
Filed under: music spotify 
March 20, 2013

(Source: Spotify)

9:55pm
Filed under: music spotify 
November 30, 2012
theparisreview:

“One afternoon in 1943, just before a lunch date with Picasso, Dina Vierny was arrested in Paris. Three months later Picasso received her note, smuggled out with the prison laundry, saying she wouldn’t be able to make it.”Sophie Pinkham on Dina Vierny and the music of the Gulag.

>Born in Chisinau, Vierny was raised in a family that was both musical and politically radical. Her father, an Odessa Jew, was a pianist who lost his virginity to an anarchist during exile in Siberia, and her aunts were what Vierny calls “demoiselles nihilistes.” Vierny had sung in the radical performance group Octobre, under the leadership of Jacques Prévert, and with the famous Dimitrieviches, émigré Roma cabaret singers. In prison, she sang for those about to be executed, every Saturday. She had a large repertoire, and she took requests: in her memoirs she says that one young Communist waiting to be shot asked her to sing Edith Piaf through the cell window. She never saw his face.

theparisreview:

“One afternoon in 1943, just before a lunch date with Picasso, Dina Vierny was arrested in Paris. Three months later Picasso received her note, smuggled out with the prison laundry, saying she wouldn’t be able to make it.”

Sophie Pinkham on Dina Vierny and the music of the Gulag.

>Born in Chisinau, Vierny was raised in a family that was both musical and politically radical. Her father, an Odessa Jew, was a pianist who lost his virginity to an anarchist during exile in Siberia, and her aunts were what Vierny calls “demoiselles nihilistes.” Vierny had sung in the radical performance group Octobre, under the leadership of Jacques Prévert, and with the famous Dimitrieviches, émigré Roma cabaret singers. In prison, she sang for those about to be executed, every Saturday. She had a large repertoire, and she took requests: in her memoirs she says that one young Communist waiting to be shot asked her to sing Edith Piaf through the cell window. She never saw his face.

August 19, 2012
untitled on Flickr.I took some photos of Algernon at The Space….

untitled on Flickr.

I took some photos of Algernon at The Space….

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